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May 2011

Puerto Jiménez

"Despite its small size and languid pace, Puerto Jiménez is a bustling little burg, where rough jungle gold-panners mix with wealthy eco-tourists, budget backpackers, and a smattering of celebrities seeking a small dose of anonymity and escape. Located on the southeastern tip of the Osa Peninsula, the town itself is just a couple of gravel streets with the ubiquitous soccer field, a block of general stores, some inexpensive sodas (diners), a butcher shop, and several bars.

What's that squirmy, slimy thing?

Elusive amphibian found in El Remanso! Because of its underground life, caecilians are a very rare creature to come across in the rainforest. An unknowing observer could easily mistake one for a large earthworm or a small snake; actually local Costa Ricans commonly call them “serpiente de dos cabezas” (two-headed snake), because shape and size-wise it’s hard to tell head from tail!

Nutrition week in Puerto Jiménez

Every year the Costa Rican Ministry of Health arranges for celebrations across the country to promote healthy eating habits in families throughout its territory. In Puerto Jiménez the local school puts together a short parade, where the children dress up in cute outfits representing different types of foods. In this photo we can see fruits and vegetables along with a big bar of chocolate (veggies v.s junk food)! Let us know if you would like to join us in our celebrations this week!

Watch out! Dangerous feast above!

To anyone who’s planning on visiting soon: beware of the falling beach almonds! The beach almond trees around our restaurant are the Scarlet Macaws’ favorite diet source. Now that the trees are fruiting, the scarlet macaws are there every day, cracking the hard nutshells to eat the delicious almonds, and dropping the shells from the top of the tall trees. So just be sure to stand in a safe spot when you approach for this fantastic photo opportunity. Enjoy some of our recent pictures taken by Dani!

Animal tracks training

The Yaguará Wildcat Conservation Program (www.yaguara.org) recently gave a workshop to teach local guides in the area how to identify animals by their tracks. Needless to say, we did not miss the opportunity to send one of our guides, Rinaldo, over to learn from these experts in wildlife observation and conservation. Rinaldo came back full of enthusiasm and knowledge on how to not only identify, but also collect tracks as a reminder of the diverse fauna that can be found at El Remanso’s rainforest reserve.

WISH US LUCK!

Tomorrow's a big day for us: we get evaluated for the Certification for Sustainable Tourism! Ever since El Remanso's creation, we've strived to make the most positive impact in our surroundings, producing 100% of our energy from renewable resources, putting our property into conservation, working with local providers, cooking with as many organic ingredients as we can get, refusing to treat our pool with chemicals or placing air-conditioning and cable in our rooms, hiring only local people, inviting you to enjoy the rainforest in its most natural state and many other efforts.